MatthewClayfield.com

Matthew Clayfield is a journalist, critic and screenwriter.

quangngai

The train to Quảng Ngãi

It was in the canteen car of the late-night service that the Vietnam veteran finally told me his story. We’d been friends for months, regulars at a Louisiana-themed bar off Saigon’s Bùi Viện backpacker strip, […]

hoian

A ramble ’round Hội An

Named for Vietnam’s ubiquitous dish of water spinach and garlic, Morning Glory in Hội An’s ancient town regularly packs them in. One of local restaurateur Trinh Diem Vy’s four local eateries (Ms Vy, as she […]

Sandor Jaszberenyi’s ‘The Devil is a Black Dog’ fires on reporters

At what point should a journalist transmute first-hand experience into fiction? Where does one draw the line between what can be reported as fact and what should probably be reported some other way, even if […]

Nov, 21

Democracy was the loser in Turkey’s election

To the surprise of the country’s pollsters and pundits, Turkey’s status quo has been restored. The victory of President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s Justice and Development Party (AKP) in Sunday’s parliamentary election sets the country back […]

Nov, 03

The Vietnam War’s ‘time bomb’ legacy for Laos

The confrontation is immediate—ia hundred cluster bombs suspended from the ceiling on fishing wire. This deadly mobile of “bombies”, as the locals call them, symbolises the lethal legacy of Laos’s Vietnam War experience. It is […]

Oct, 29

Gibbon take: The high flyers of Laos

It is probably the greatest shower in the world. Open to the elements, it looks on to Laos’s Nam Kan National Park, northwest of Luang Prabang near the Laos-Thai border. The park sprawls away from […]

Oct, 17

Pierre Gagnaire takes on La Maison 1888 in Vietnam’s Da Nang

Pierre Gagnaire has spent the morning swimming. Never mind that the sixty-five-year-old Frenchman arrived in Da Nang, on Vietnam’s central coast, just last night, having spent the week visiting his restaurants in Tokyo and Seoul. […]

Oct, 17



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  • I wonder if people still keep wine at home.
  • I spent three days in Konya trying to find a drop. Sydney is the new Konya!
  • I will admit that not being able to buy booze in Istanbul after ten is a pain in the ass. Not being able to buy booze in Grozny sucks.